College of Professional and Continuing Education

Summer I Undergraduate Courses - 2015

For CRN's, also: Summer 2015 I Schedule

Art

Basic Drawing

ART1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10052

J. Johnson

Introduces students to basic drawing concepts such as: line, volume, shape, perspective, value and composition. There will be a strong emphasis on observational methods to learn these basic concepts. Requires no previous experience. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


Techniques of Ceramics

ART1080 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10014

L. Freedman

Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, sculptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Luminous Watercolor

ART1530 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10373

L. Freedman

Students will become acquainted with the many techniques of watercolor through demonstration, exercises and instruction. Color theory and applications will be stressed. Through individual problem solving, the creation of luminous paintings in abstract, illustration, still life and landscape will be our goal. Open to novice as well as advanced students. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


American Sign Language

American Sign Language I

ASL1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10016

J. Dunn

An introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), including grammar, basic vocabulary, manual alphabets/numbers, and visual gestural communication. ASL written code will also be covered.


Chemistry

Science of Weapons of Mass Destruction

CHEM0070 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10050

E. Krygier

The science behind weapons of mass destruction will be discussed. Topics include low-technology explosives, nerve agents, biological agents and nuclear devices. In each case, introductory science concepts will be used to explain how the device or agent works. Historical examples will be reviewed, such as the Oklahoma bombing, Wisconsin Army Research Lab bombing, Tokyo Sarin subway attack, World War I gas attacks, Kurdish gas attack, anthrax letters and Hiroshima/Nagasaki. The technical basis for preventing the use of these weapons will also be discussed as will be the availability of information on the Internet.


Introduction to Chemistry I

CHEM1010 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10049

E. Krygier

An introduction to the fundamental chemical concepts of chemistry as well as the applications as they relate to structure, bonding and reactivity of molecules. In addition, the laboratory will teach techniques of chemical experimentation, along with methods of chemical analysis. Contact COPACE for lab fee information.


Effective Speaking and Presenting

COMM1210 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10026

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Introduction to Advertising

COMM1340 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10007

J. Mitchell

Analysis and implementation of basic advertising principles. Reading, class discussion, research and in-class workshops are required.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

COMM1770 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10081

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

COMM2360 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10366

J. Greenhalgh

Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Computer Science

Introduction to Management Information Systems

CSCI1770 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10080

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Economics

Economics and the World Economy

ECON1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10005

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


English

Mythologies

ENG2050 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10023

L. Bastien

The purpose of this course is to expose students to various systems of myth from a number of global cultures. We will examine both the similarities and differences of the myths and consider why this is so. In addition, we also will examine the idea of mythic thinking, or consciousness, and why such forms of thought and image are deemed necessary for the psychological and moral health of the cultures in which they form an inherent, and crucial part.


Modern Monsters: The Serial Killer in Literature and Film

ENG2420 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10370

J. Plante

The genre of serial killer fiction is a direct descendent of Gothic fiction, with the serial killers as updated models of Gothic villains. Like their Gothic predecessors, fictional serial killers are mythologized, folklorized and, in some cases, supernaturalized. Beginning with Psycho, students will critically analyze serial killer fiction novels and films of the mid-20th century to the present while investigating the following themes: American notions and expressions of individuality; the sociopolitical climate in which the serial killer is defined and the ways in which the narratives criticize this climate; changing notions of gender roles and anxieties therein; sexual anxieties; the expressions of cultural desires; and how myth informs the serial killer narratives. Prerequisite: VE fulfilled.


Environmental Studies

Earth Systems Science

ES1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10408

N. Gill

An introduction to the structure and function of the earth system, with a focus on how the Earth system sutains life. Topics include the connections among the terrestrial surface, oceans, and atmosphere and how these connections create and sustain the climates and biomes of the world and provide ecosystem services.


Film

Modern Monsters: The Serial Killer in Literature and Film

FILM2420 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10371

J. Plante

The genre of serial killer fiction is a direct descendent of Gothic fiction, with the serial killers as updated models of Gothic villains. Like their Gothic predecessors, fictional serial killers are mythologized, folkorized and, in some cases, supernaturalized. Beginning with Psycho, students will critically analyze serial killer fiction novels and films of the mid-20th century to the present while investigating the following themes: American notions and expressions of individuality; the sociopolitical climate in which the serial killer is defined and the ways in which the narratives criticize this climate; changing notions of gender roles and anxieties therein; sexual anxieties; the expressions of cultural desires; and how myth informs the serial killer narratives. Prerequisite: VE fulfilled.


Geography

Earth System Science

GEOG1040 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10407

N. Gill

An introduction to the structure and function of the earth system, with a focus on how the Earth system sutains life. Topics include the connections among the terrestrial surface, oceans, and atmosphere and how these connections create and sustain the climates and biomes of the world and provide ecosystem services.


History

A History of Russia: to 1861

HIST1560 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10381

C. Wilson

A study of Russia from the Kievan period to the emancipation of 1861 with special attention to such topics as the Byzantine influence, Westernization, technological development, art and literature, and the Russian revolutionary tradition. Emphasis is on societal and cultural evolution, as well as essential political problems.


Human Resource Development

Effective Speaking and Presenting

HRD1210 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10027

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

HRD2360 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10367

J. Greenhalgh

Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


International and Comparative Studies

Economics and the World Economy

INTL1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10006

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


History ofRussia to 1861

INTL1560 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10382

C. Wilson

A study of Russia from the Kievan period to the emancipation of 1861 with special attention to such topics as the Byzantine influence, Westernization, technological development, art and literature, and the Russian revolutionary tradition. Emphasis is on societal and cultural evolution, as well as essential political problems.


Mathematics

Calculus I

MATH1200 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10012

B. Casey

Topics include: functions, limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, continuity, related-rates problems, maximum-minimum problems, definition of integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus.


Statistics

MATH1470 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10019

D. Thamarapani

Students have the opportunity to learn the rationale behind the fundamental areas of descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as the mechanics involved with each: graphic representation of data, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square, regression and correlation and nonparametric statistics.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

PA2360 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10368

J. Greenhalgh

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Philosophy

Philosophy and Politics

PHIL1340 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10387

P. Marton

Politicians like to reference political theories (Locke's or Mill's, or the Australian economists', e.g.) to frame their vision and they label their opponents (as socialists, liberals, etc.). We will look beyond the labels and discuss these theories themselves. We will consider a wide range of historical and contemporary political theories that attempt to answer these and similar questions: What is the most ideal form of government? What obligations, fundamental rights and liberties do we have? Should wealth be distributed over the members of the society or should property right be sacred and unquestionable? This course is designed to help you form your own political views and understand their historical roots and the arguments for and against them.


Physics

Introductory Physics I

PHYS1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10002

M. Hannout

This is an introductory level course stressing both conceptual understanding and problem solving skills. This is a survey course for undergraduate students irrespective of their major. The course stresses the simplicity and self-consistency of physical models in explaining a variety of physical phenomena. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, Mechanical Waves and a brief introduction to the thermal properties of matter. Calculus is not required, but elements of algebra and trigonometry are reviewed and utilized. PHYS 1010, with PHYS 1020, fulfills the usual entrance equiremnets for medical and dental schools. Labs are integrated within the course frame work, and will be conducted at the same classroom where lectures are held. Computer simulations will be utilized to enhance students' understanding of course topics. Contact COPACE for lab fee information.


Psychology

Adolescent Development

PSYC1520 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10409

C. Reigeluth

This course is designed to introduce you to the research and theory of adolescent and early/emerging adulthood development. We will discuss topics such as change vs. stability in personlity, transitions into long-term relationships/parenthood, and media use in adolescence. We will explore the biological, social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of development, paying particular attention to the contextual factors that direct and inform developmental outcomes. An overarching theme will involve the consideration of how cultural factors and the social world influence development.


Adolescent Development

PSYC1520 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 10505

This course is designed to introduce you to the research and theory of adolescent and early/emerging adulthood development. We will discuss topics such as change vs. stability in personlity, transitions into long-term relationships/parenthood, and media use in adolescence. We will explore the biological, social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of development, paying particular attention to the contextual factors that direct and inform developmental outcomes. An overarching theme will involve the consideration of how cultural factors and the social world influence development.


Psychology of Religion

PSYC2420 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10426

J. Laplante

An investigation of religion and religious traditions through the lens of psychology. We will be investigating religious beliefs, experiences, and behavior through an examination of psychological research and theory, both historical and contemporary. We will be drawing on a diversity of psychological approaches, such as biological, developmental, social, cognitive, cultural, and humanistic.


Social Services

The Final Chapter: A Study of Death and Dying

SCSV1090 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10021

J. Nowicki

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.


Sociology

The Final Chapter: A Study in Death and Dying

SOC1090 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10020

J. Nowicki

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.