College of Professional and Continuing Education

Summer I Undergraduate Courses - 2015

For CRN's, also: Summer 2015 I Schedule

Art

Basic Drawing

ART1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10052

J. Johnson

Introduces students to basic drawing concepts such as: line, volume, shape, perspective, value and composition. There will be a strong emphasis on observational methods to learn these basic concepts. Requires no previous experience. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


Techniques of Ceramics

ART1080 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10014

L. Freedman

Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, sculptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Luminous Watercolor

ART1530 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10373

L. Freedman

Students will become acquainted with the many techniques of watercolor through demonstration, exercises and instruction. Color theory and applications will be stressed. Through individual problem solving, the creation of luminous paintings in abstract, illustration, still life and landscape will be our goal. Open to novice as well as advanced students. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


Essentials of Modern Art

ART1780 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10377

J. Hayes-Nikas

In this course we will focus on demystifying the all too often intimidating and misunderstood art of the 20th century; and making it rather palatable and quite easy to approach. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary cultural trends, the course then explores the roots of these trends by turning to the Modernist period. After some training in 'aesthetic scanning'; a method for looking at writing about and discussing art; students will have the opportunity to study the connections with the major artistic movements from Impressionism through-to Post-Modern performance, informational, word, installation, and street art.


Drawing Extended-Works On Paper

ART2120 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10411

L. Johnson

Concentrating on more expressive use of drawing materials we will work with both observation and imagination with consideration of composition and scale. More comples objscts will be drawn from and include the use of color and wet media. Standard drawing materials will be augmented with the inclusion of collage, montage, monotype and "accidental" effects". Demonstartions and discussions of artists' works will exand our approach to drawing in expressing our dreams and visions. Previous drawing experience is necessary. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


American Sign Language

American Sign Language I

ASL1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10016

J. Dunn

An introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), including grammar, basic vocabulary, manual alphabets/numbers, and visual gestural communication. ASL written code will also be covered.


Chemistry

Science of Weapons of Mass Destruction

CHEM0070 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10050

E. Krygier

The science behind weapons of mass destruction will be discussed. Topics include low-technology explosives, nerve agents, biological agents and nuclear devices. In each case, introductory science concepts will be used to explain how the device or agent works. Historical examples will be reviewed, such as the Oklahoma bombing, Wisconsin Army Research Lab bombing, Tokyo Sarin subway attack, World War I gas attacks, Kurdish gas attack, anthrax letters and Hiroshima/Nagasaki. The technical basis for preventing the use of these weapons will also be discussed as will be the availability of information on the Internet.


Introduction to Chemistry I

CHEM1010 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10049

E. Krygier

An introduction to the fundamental chemical concepts of chemistry as well as the applications as they relate to structure, bonding and reactivity of molecules. In addition, the laboratory will teach techniques of chemical experimentation, along with methods of chemical analysis. Contact COPACE for lab fee information.


Criminal Justice

Drugs and Crime in Society I

CJ1240 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10375

T. O'Connor

A law enforcement prospective of how drugs are impacting our lives. All forms of drug abuse and the cost it inflicts on society will be examined. The War on Drugs will be reviewed including the latest developments and the Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 94C Narcotics Law.


Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

CJ1960 M W 0600p-0900p    Section: 1
CRN: 10364

C. Gold

This course provides a broad overview of forensic anthropology-an applied field of biological anthropology. Forensic anthropology is the application of the science of physical/biological anthropology to the legal process. The identification of skeletal human remains is important for both legal and humanitarian reasons. Forensic anthropologists work to determine age, sex, ancestry, stature and unique features from the skeleton. While proficiency in forensic methods will not be the focus of this course, general identification techniques will be addressed. A combination of readings from the assigned textbook and articles assigned by the instructor will form the basis of class lecture and discussion.


Contemporary Criminal Procedure

CJ1970 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10404

E. Karcasinas

What are the rights of someone accused of a crime? What protections do you have to be free from governmental intrusions into your home, car or computer? We will examine both federal and state constitutional provisions that provide the framework under which law enforcement must operate. This will include the right to an attorney, the need for law enforcement to obtain a search warrant to gather evidence and the limits on whether statements can be used against you in a criminal proceeding.


Technologies in Criminal justice

CJ1980 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10400

T. O'Connor

Could modern technology have solved or possibly even prevented some of the most notorious crimes of the past century? Are modern day social networking sites such as facebook, myspace and twitter creating new more easily accessible victims such as those involved in the alleged "Craigslist killings" or are they an invaluable tool to law enforcement officials in the tracking and subsequent arrests of these predators? Throughout this course we will examine the application of developing technologies in the field of criminal justice. Students learn forensic science techniques, computer applications for disasters and emergencies, record management systems, crime mapping, and automated fingerprint identification systems. The course also covers computerized booking systems, integrated criminal justice information systems, less than lethal weapons, and "interoperable" wireless communications. Students explore the relationships of these new technologies and how they influence changes in criminal justice agency policy and procedure. The impact of social networking sites will also be explored in depth. Prerequisite: ENG 1000 or equivalent.


Great American Criminal Trials

CJ2090 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10374

D. Moran

From colonial times to the present, trials have been the ultimate means to resolve disputes in American society. They also serve as a source of popular entertainment, public ritual and real-life drama. Included in the trials we study will be Lizzie Bordon, John Hinckley, Louis Woodward and the recent Massachusetts trials of Drs. Sharpe and Greinder; John Geoghan's child molestation trial and Commonwealth v. Junta. We will examine the seriousness of the crimes, the impaneling of jurors, trial tactics, verdicts, etc.


Effective Speaking and Presenting

COMM1210 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10026

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Introduction to Advertising

COMM1340 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10007

J. Mitchell

Analysis and implementation of basic advertising principles. Reading, class discussion, research and in-class workshops are required.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

COMM1770 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10081

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Organizational Behavior

COMM2020 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10376

J. Lambert

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

COMM2360 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10366

J. Greenhalgh

Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Computer Science

Introduction to Management Information Systems

CSCI1770 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10080

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

CSCI2750 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10410

T. Smieszek

An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.


Economics

Economics and the World Economy

ECON1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10005

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


Microeconomics

ECON2051 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10363

A. Bukhatwa

Describes and analyzes how a market-oriented economy functions in answering basic economic concerns. Interspersed with theory, the course focuses on particular examples that demonstrate the use of microeconomics to solve problems faced by decision makers in both the private and public sectors.


Macroeconomics

ECON2052 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10362

M. Wijekoon

Focuses on the forces that affect overall performance of the economy, studying the determinants of economic activity and measures of economic performance. In addition, students explore specific current economic problems facing the United States, public policies instituted to deal with problems and repercussions of some of these policies on world economics.


English

Writings of Place and Nature

ENG1230 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10386

J. Bane-Robert

"It is not down in any map; true places never are," Herman Melville wrote in "Moby Dick." We are increasingly disconnected from the spirit of the natural world and our sense of place in this burgeoning technological age. The goal of this course is to reawaken our inherent connection to the earth, and place, in order to helps us see the world more clearly and understand it more deeply. We will study "nature writing" by those who have a special connection to the earth anchored a certain place, from Emerson and Thoreau to contemporary authors. As time permits we will conduct field studies, a film study, and be visited by an author. This course will explore what place can teach us, how it shapes our vision and sense of self along with our world view. Through reading and discussing essays, poems, and works of nonfiction, we will learn how we can be more aware of the world that sustains and surrounds us. Writing for this class will include creative pieces as well as analytical essays, and there will be a final project addressing a place of your choosing.


Mythologies

ENG2050 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10023

L. Bastien

The purpose of this course is to expose students to various systems of myth from a number of global cultures. We will examine both the similarities and differences of the myths and consider why this is so. In addition, we also will examine the idea of mythic thinking, or consciousness, and why such forms of thought and image are deemed necessary for the psychological and moral health of the cultures in which they form an inherent, and crucial part.


Modern Monsters: The Serial Killer in Literature and Film

ENG2420 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10370

J. Plante

The genre of serial killer fiction is a direct descendent of Gothic fiction, with the serial killers as updated models of Gothic villains. Like their Gothic predecessors, fictional serial killers are mythologized, folklorized and, in some cases, supernaturalized. Beginning with Psycho, students will critically analyze serial killer fiction novels and films of the mid-20th century to the present while investigating the following themes: American notions and expressions of individuality; the sociopolitical climate in which the serial killer is defined and the ways in which the narratives criticize this climate; changing notions of gender roles and anxieties therein; sexual anxieties; the expressions of cultural desires; and how myth informs the serial killer narratives. Prerequisite: VE fulfilled.


Environmental Studies

Earth Systems Science

ES1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10408

N. Gill

An introduction to the structure and function of the earth system, with a focus on how the Earth system sutains life. Topics include the connections among the terrestrial surface, oceans, and atmosphere and how these connections create and sustain the climates and biomes of the world and provide ecosystem services.


International and Environmental Politics

ES1650 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10412

P. Nirmal

The Earth is Warming! The Climate is changing! We have too much snow! We have too little sun! If you live in the northern hemisphere, you've either heard all of these things, or said them yourself! Sometime during this last decade, while the world's leaders were figuring out how to increase wealth and improve standards of living, the world itself has come upon an impending global environmental crisis. Suddenly, it would seem, the environment has become a momentous site of contention and conflict. To understand this increasing occurrence of environmental conflicts in its local and global context, and further explore ways to manage and mitigate such conflicts, in this class, we will take a keen look at environmental politics. We start by asking, 'what is the environment' and ground ourselves theoretically by using the concept of 'environmental justice'. We then explore various case studies from around the world, aiming to understand a) the socio-ecological origin of the conflict, b) the claims, grievances and demands of those engaged in conflict, and finally, c) the role of environmental governance in managing, mitigating and resolving such conflicts. The case studies will be drawn from different parts of the world, within four broad themes, representing different ways of understanding the environment.


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

ES2750 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10068

T. Smieszek

An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.


Film

Modern Monsters: The Serial Killer in Literature and Film

FILM2420 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10371

J. Plante

The genre of serial killer fiction is a direct descendent of Gothic fiction, with the serial killers as updated models of Gothic villains. Like their Gothic predecessors, fictional serial killers are mythologized, folkorized and, in some cases, supernaturalized. Beginning with Psycho, students will critically analyze serial killer fiction novels and films of the mid-20th century to the present while investigating the following themes: American notions and expressions of individuality; the sociopolitical climate in which the serial killer is defined and the ways in which the narratives criticize this climate; changing notions of gender roles and anxieties therein; sexual anxieties; the expressions of cultural desires; and how myth informs the serial killer narratives. Prerequisite: VE fulfilled.


Geography

Earth System Science

GEOG1040 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10407

N. Gill

An introduction to the structure and function of the earth system, with a focus on how the Earth system sutains life. Topics include the connections among the terrestrial surface, oceans, and atmosphere and how these connections create and sustain the climates and biomes of the world and provide ecosystem services.


History

A History of Russia: to 1861

HIST1560 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10381

C. Wilson

A study of Russia from the Kievan period to the emancipation of 1861 with special attention to such topics as the Byzantine influence, Westernization, technological development, art and literature, and the Russian revolutionary tradition. Emphasis is on societal and cultural evolution, as well as essential political problems.


Twentieth Century Europe: Versailles to European Union

HIST2070 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10383

C. Wilson

In 1900 Europe was made up of the most dominant industrial and politically powerful states in the world. No other region could compare with Europe in military power and political influence. Only the United States compared with Europe in terms of wealth and productivity. We will investigate the cataclysmic events in Europe from the conclusion of World War I to the rise of a united Europe and the European union formed at Maastricht in 1993.


Human Resource Development

Effective Speaking and Presenting

HRD1210 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10027

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Organizational Behavior

HRD2020 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10402

J. Lambert

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

HRD2360 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10367

J. Greenhalgh

Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


International and Comparative Studies

Economics and the World Economy

INTL1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10006

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


History ofRussia to 1861

INTL1560 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10382

C. Wilson

A study of Russia from the Kievan period to the emancipation of 1861 with special attention to such topics as the Byzantine influence, Westernization, technological development, art and literature, and the Russian revolutionary tradition. Emphasis is on societal and cultural evolution, as well as essential political problems.


International and Environmental Politics

INTL1650 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10413

P. Nirmal

The Earth is Warming! The Climate is changing! We have too much snow! We have too little sun! If you live in the northern hemisphere, you've either heard all of these things, or said them yourself! Sometime during this last decade, while the world's leaders were figuring out how to increase wealth and improve standards of living, the world itself has come upon an impending global environmental crisis. Suddenly, it would seem, the environment has become a momentous site of contention and conflict. To understand this increasing occurrence of environmental conflicts in its local and global context, and further explore ways to manage and mitigate such conflicts, in this class, we will take a keen look at environmental politics. We start by asking, 'what is the environment' and ground ourselves theoretically by using the concept of 'environmental justice'. We then explore various case studies from around the world, aiming to understand a) the socio-ecological origin of the conflict, b) the claims, grievances and demands of those engaged in conflict, and finally, c) the role of environmental governance in managing, mitigating and resolving such conflicts. The case studies will be drawn from different parts of the world, within four broad themes, representing different ways of understanding the environment.


Essentials of Modern Art

INTL1780 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10378

J. Hayes-Nikas

In this course we will focus on demystifying the all too often intimidating and misunderstood art of the 20th century; and making it rather palatable and quite easy to approach. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary cultural trends, the course then explores the roots of these trends by turning to the Modernist period. After some training in 'aesthetic scanning'; a method for looking at writing about and discussing art; students will have the opportunity to study the connections with the major artistic movements from Impressionism through-to Post-Modern performance, informational, word, installation, and street art.


Twentieth Century Europe: Versailles to European Union

INTL2090 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10384

C. Wilson

In 1900 Europe was made up of the most dominant industrial and politically powerful states in the world. No other region could compare with Europe in military power and political influence. Only the United States compared with Europe in terms of wealth and productivity. We will investigate the cataclysmic events in Europe from the conclusion of World War I to the rise of a united Europe and the European union formed at Maastricht in 1993.


Mathematics

Precalculus

MATH1110 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10113

B. Casey

Intended for students going on to calculus. Topics include coordinate geometry, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions and trigonometry. A solid grasp of elementary algebra is assumed.


Calculus I

MATH1200 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10012

B. Casey

Topics include: functions, limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, continuity, related-rates problems, maximum-minimum problems, definition of integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus.


Statistics

MATH1470 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10019

D. Thamarapani

Students have the opportunity to learn the rationale behind the fundamental areas of descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as the mechanics involved with each: graphic representation of data, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square, regression and correlation and nonparametric statistics.


Organizational Behavior

PA2020 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10403

J. Lambert

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

PA2360 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10368

J. Greenhalgh

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Philosophy

Philosophy and Politics

PHIL1340 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10387

P. Marton

Politicians like to reference political theories (Locke's or Mill's, or the Australian economists', e.g.) to frame their vision and they label their opponents (as socialists, liberals, etc.). We will look beyond the labels and discuss these theories themselves. We will consider a wide range of historical and contemporary political theories that attempt to answer these and similar questions: What is the most ideal form of government? What obligations, fundamental rights and liberties do we have? Should wealth be distributed over the members of the society or should property right be sacred and unquestionable? This course is designed to help you form your own political views and understand their historical roots and the arguments for and against them.


Physics

Introductory Physics I

PHYS1010 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10002

M. Hannout

This is an introductory level course stressing both conceptual understanding and problem solving skills. This is a survey course for undergraduate students irrespective of their major. The course stresses the simplicity and self-consistency of physical models in explaining a variety of physical phenomena. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, Mechanical Waves and a brief introduction to the thermal properties of matter. Calculus is not required, but elements of algebra and trigonometry are reviewed and utilized. PHYS 1010, with PHYS 1020, fulfills the usual entrance equiremnets for medical and dental schools. Labs are integrated within the course frame work, and will be conducted at the same classroom where lectures are held. Computer simulations will be utilized to enhance students' understanding of course topics. Contact COPACE for lab fee information.


Psychology

Introduction to Clinical & Counseling Psychology

PSYC1480 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10024

D. Lambert

Provides an overview of psychologists role in contemporary culture. This course critically examines various theories of cognitive, educational and personality assessment. It reviews theories of intervention and change with attention to their assumptions concerning normal and normative behavior and assesses current directions in health psychology.


Adolescent Development

PSYC1520 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10409

C. Reigeluth

This course is designed to introduce you to the research and theory of adolescent and early/emerging adulthood development. We will discuss topics such as change vs. stability in personlity, transitions into long-term relationships/parenthood, and media use in adolescence. We will explore the biological, social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of development, paying particular attention to the contextual factors that direct and inform developmental outcomes. An overarching theme will involve the consideration of how cultural factors and the social world influence development.


Social Psychology

PSYC1700 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10385

J. Laplante

Provides a systematic introduction to the field of social psychology, which studies how the thoughts, feelings and actions of a person are influenced by other people and social situations. We will explore the power of situations, culture and context, as well as how people individually react and think about certain social situations.


Abnormal Psychology

PSYC1730 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10110

C. Reigeluth

This course begins with a discussion of the manner in which abnormal behavior has been traditionally defined and the implications of these definitions. A comprehensive overview of the major categories of abnormal behavioral disorders is then provided with an emphasis on theory and research (e.g., schizophrenia, affective disorders, substance abuse, eating disorders, etc.). Special attention is paid to issues of assessment, intervention, and prevention.


PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION

PSYC2420 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10426

J. Laplante


Science

Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

SCIS1960 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10365

C. Gold

This course provides a broad overview of forensic anthropology-an applied field of biological anthropology. Forensic anthropology is the application of the science of physical/biological anthropology to the legal process. The identification of skeletal human remains is important for both legal and humanitarian reasons. Forensic anthropologists work to determine age, sex, ancestry, stature and unique features from the skeleton. While proficiency in forensic methods will not be the focus of this course, general identification techniques will be addressed. A combination of readings from the assigned textbook and articles assigned by the instructor will form the basis of class lecture and discussion.


Social Services

The Final Chapter: A Study of Death and Dying

SCSV1090 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10021

J. Nowicki

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.


Sociology

Introduction to Sociology

SOC1010 M W 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10372

J. Nowicki

Introduces the basic concepts in the field of sociology with emphasis upon the application of these concepts to the understanding of the American institutions of politics, economics, religion, education, marriage and family.


The Final Chapter: A Study in Death and Dying

SOC1090 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10020

J. Nowicki

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.


Deviant Behavior

SOC2630 T R 0600p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 10369

M. Butler

What is deviance and how is it "constructed" within society? While some experts on deviance take a decidedly objective approach to deviance-the idea that all cultures recognize certain behaviors as deviant and unacceptable, this course will focus on the ways in which deviance is socially constructed-the idea that behaviors are deemed "deviant" based on societal definitions and are therefore not static but subject to change. Viewing deviance through a subjective (rather than objective) lens requires that we pay close attention to the dialogue that takes place between individuals and society over time, as it is this dialogue that will help us to determine what is and what is not acceptable within society. This course uses cultural, social, political, and even religious cues as clues to uncover deviance within society in all of its forms and functions.