College of Professional and Continuing Education

Fall Undergraduate Courses — 2013

For CRN's see: Fall 2013 Schedule

Accounting

Principles of Accounting

ACCT1010 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23191

Staff

Provides a basic understanding of financial accounting. Students will gain an understanding of accounting principles and procedures. The valuation of assets and liabilities as well as recognition of income and expenses will be examined. Through this study the student will be able to communicate the financial position of the organization.


Art

Beginning Drawing

ART1010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23112

Lynne Johnson

Introduces students to basic drawing concepts such as: line, volume, shape, perspective, value and composition. There will be a strong emphasis on observational methods to learn these basic concepts. Requires no previous experience. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


Introduction to Photography

ART1030 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23182

Staff

Introduces students to the medium of photography as an art form and means of communication. The zone system, camera functions, composition and printing are covered in detail. Class discussion on contemporary and historical views of photography are encouraged. In this studio/laboratory course, students are in the darkroom developing black and white film and printing archival fiberbase silver prints. By course completion, students produce a fine small portfolio of prints. Must have 35 mm camera capable of manual settings. Materials Fee: $50.00.


Techniques of Ceramics

ART1080 T 0330p-0630p    Section: 1
CRN: 23132

Linda Freedman

Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, scuptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Materials fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Clay and Fiber

ART1140 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23110

Linda Freedman

Explores the historical, traditional and contemporary artistic applications of these two plastic mediums. Students will gain a working knowledge of traditional and experimental ceramic and fiber techniques. Design quality will be stressed throughout as a fundamental aspect of good craftsmanship. Students will gain an understanding of the artistic heritage inherent in crafts of the past and present. Materials fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Introduction to Digital Photography

ART1160 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23144

Rachel Loischild

Designed to work artistically within a computer-mediated environment, this course is intended as a venue for discussing the history, current practices and social value of technology-based creativity in the field of photography. You will learn to use the digital camera, Adobe Photoshop, scanners and printers to complete the digital workflow. Students must have a digital camera and a digital SLR is strongly suggested. Materials fee:$100.00.


Photography Projects

ART2000 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23140

Stephen DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Prerequisite: Introductory and Intermediate Photography. Materials fee: $100.00.


Printmaking by Hand

ART2090 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23197

Staff

Explore the look of the printed image and contrast it with drawn or painted images, with no need of a printmaking press. Any irregular surface that will hold ink can be printed such as fabric, woodgrain, leaves and found manufactured objects. Also work from your own and found photos, drawings and paintings through easily accessable techniques including gum transfers, embossing, collograph, trace print, monotype and linocut. All will be accomplished by hand, with simple tools and nontoxic materials. Discover the richness of printable surfaces existing in your immediate environment. Techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course with suggested problems for sampling each technique, aiming towards the creation of one significant work by course end which may use one or several combined techniques. Works by Picasso, Klee, Munch, Degas and others will be studied for examples of the sophisticated possibilities of this work. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


Intermediate Photography Projects

ART2100 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23141

Stephen DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Prerequisite: Photography Projects. Materials fee: $100.00.


Advanced Photography Projects

ART2200 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23142

Stephen DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography Projects. Materials fee: $100.00.


American Sign Language

Beginning American Sign Language I

ASL1010 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23181

John Dunn

An introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), including grammar, basic vocabulary, manual alphabets/numbers, and visual gestural communication. ASL written code will also be covered.


Beginning American Sign Language III

ASL1030 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23115

John Dunn

A continuation of ASL II, this course will focus on further development of visual-spatial orientation and manipulation skills, sign vocabulary and complex sentence structures. Students will continue to work on strategies for opening, sustaining and closing general conversations on a range of topics. They will also further develop the ability to question, narrate and give increasingly detailed descriptions of activities, interactions, plans and directions. Prerequisite: American Sign Language II.


Criminal Justice

The American Criminal Justice System

CJ1220 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23482

Staff

Explores the criminal justice system through the eyes of the individual participants. Students explore the different stages within the system from investigation and arrest through trial, sentencing and corrections. Guest speakers representing many of the agencies involved in the criminal justice process will offer the class a first-hand look into the realities of their positions, as well as their opinions about the overall effectiveness of the system. Students will also tour a local police department and lock-up.


Drugs and Crime in Society

CJ1240 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23152

Timothy O'Connor

The physiological, psychological and sociological effects of licit and illicit drugs in society will be studied. A law enforcement perspective into the so called "war on drugs", the success and failures of various drug prevention and replacement therapy programs as well as the roadblock to recovery being created by the criminal justice system and insurance companies will be discussed. Contemporary topics such as whether addiction is a choice or a disease, the pros and cons of legalization and the issue of medicinal marijuana will also be debated.


Organized Crime

CJ1990 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23146

Staff

From Capone to Bulger and beyond we will cover the history and development of organized crime as it has evolved throughout the world. We will examine law enforcements efforts at preventing and controlling organized crime. We will trace the growth of organized crime as well as how it has adapted to encompass the use of technology and other state of the art measures to enhance smuggling and other activities in their efforts to compromise law enforcement and governments.


Children in Crisis

CJ2080 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23124

Donald Moran

Explores the sensitive issues surrounding the increasing number of abused children in contemporary American culture. The biological, psychological and sociological factors affecting child abuse are used as the broad conceptual framework for prevention, identification and treatment. Focuses on the etiology of child abuse as well as treatment and the law.


Juvenile Delinquency

CJ2210 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23396

Staff

An examination of delinquency, the suspected causes of delinquent behavior, and the environmental influences of youthful misbehavior. The use of pretrial detention, shock incarceration, mandatory sentencing, and gang control efforts will be analyzed. Topics such as the role of the courts and police, status offenders, juvenile corrections, transfer of juvenile to adult courts and their impact on the Juvenile Justice system are covered.


Criminal Mind

CJ2250 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23108

Donald Moran

We will explore the profiles of the criminal personality in all of its ramifications, offering fresh perceptions into crimes in the spotlight today, from rape and domestic violence to the serial and charismatic killers. Who are these criminals and how and why do they act differently from responsible citizens? We will study the violent crime scene analysis and the key to understanding and catching violent criminals. Particular attention will be paid to the principles behind the defense of insanity as well as whether or not the defense of diminished capacity either excuses or diminishes the guilt of one who is charged with a serious crime.


Effective Speaking and Presenting

COMM1210 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23380

Martin Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Introduction to Advertising

COMM1340 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23117

John Mitchell

Analysis and implementation of basic advertising principles. Reading, class discussion, research and in-class workshops are required.


Principles of Management

COMM1530 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23192

Staff

Introduces the fundamental managerial of functions planning, organizing, lending and controlling. Through an examination of the major motivational theories of management, we will work to increase our awareness of the personal skills required to be a manager and learn to apply managerial planning, and organizing processes as well as design a control system to measure results.


Melting Pot or Salad Bowl: A Film Exploration of Multicultural America

COMM1550 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23387

Nancye Araneo

People all over the world base their opinions of the United States on what they see in American films. What do Hollywood movies say about the culture of the United States? Are they an accurate portrayal of the country and its culture? This course will examine the history and culture of the United States as presented in film.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

COMM1770 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23382

Dennis Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Organizational Behavior

COMM2020 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23384

Staff

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Interpersonal Communication

COMM2180 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23163

Erin Dolan

This course will utilize theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop interpersonal communication competence and better understand its role in the relationship context. Specific areas of study include: relationship building and maintenance, intercultural communication, conflict management and interpersonal communications in the organization.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

COMM2360 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23133

Staff

Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Computer Science

Introduction to Computing

CSCI1010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23143

Paul Coute

Introduces computer hardware systems and software applications. This is a hands-on course that teaches the MS operating system and an introductory to intermediate level of the Microsoft Office Suite application: Word (word processing), Excel (spreadsheets), PowerPoint (presentations) and Access (database). Skills learned are directly usable in the workplace and other coursework. No prior computer experience is necessary.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

CSCI1770 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23383

Dennis Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Introduction to Computer Security Essentials

CSCI1900 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23164

Staff

A practical survey of network security applications and standards. The emphasis is on applications and standards that are widely used on the Internet and for corporate networks.


Ethical Hacking

CSCI2010 F 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23433

Germinal Isern

This course provides an in-depth understanding of how to effectively protect computer networks. Students will learn the tools and penetration testing methodologies used by ethical hackers. In addition, the course provides a thorough discussion of what and who an ethical hacker is and how important they are in protecting corporate and government data from cyber attacks. Students will learn updated computer security resources that describe new vulnerabilities and innovative methods to protect networks. Also covered is a thorough update of federal and state computer crime laws, as well as changes in penalties for illegal computer hacking.


An Introduction to C++

CSCI2080 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23114

Staff

Introduces C++ programming language. Topics include input/output operations, control structures, arithmetic operations, arrays, pointers, string, classes and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug C++ language programs. Microsoft Visual C++ is available in the lab.


Software Design and Development: Algorithm and Data Structures

CSCI2120 S 0900a-1200p    Section: 1
CRN: 23432

Germinal Isern

In previous courses in computer science you were taught how to write code given a specific design and set of specifications. In this course, you will learn to develop and use certain algorithms and data structures in C++ and Java. Software systems are now ubiquitous. Virtually all electrical equipment now includes some kind of software; software is used to help run manufacturing industry, schools and universities, health care, finance and government; many people use software of different kinds for entertainment and education. The specification, development, management, and evolution of these software systems make up the discipline of software engineering. Software engineering was developed in response to the problems of building large, custom software systems for defense, government, and industrial applications. We now develop a much wider range of software, from games to specialized consoles through personal computer products and web based systems to very large-scale distribution systems. Although some techniques that are appropriate for custom systems, such as object-oriented development, are universal, new software engineering techniques are evolving for different types of software. It is not possible to cover every thing in one book, so I have concentrated on universal techniques for developing large-scale sytems rather than individual software products. During the course of this term the students will be involved with a real problem solving/software development situation. Students will be required to gather functional requirements, identify the problem, form a solution and present this solution to a prospective customer.


Database Management

CSCI2150 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23439

Staff

Presents concepts of database management systems. Covers theories of database design as well as methods for developing and implementing on-line information systems. Includes practical experience with one or more existing DBMS packages. Attention: This course is open to graduate students. Please see your program director for permission.


Computer Forensics

CSCI2270 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23166

Staff

Presents methods to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation, beginning with a discussion of ethics while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specailists (IACIS) certification. Students should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises.


Economics

Economics and the World Economy

ECON1010 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23398

Staff

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


Microeconomics

ECON2051 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23231

Staff

Describes and analyzes how a market-oriented economy functions in answering basic economic concerns. Interspersed with theory, the course focuses on particular examples that demonstrate the use of microeconomics to solve problems faced by decision makers in both the private and public sectors.


Macroeconomics

ECON2052 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23119

Staff

Focuses on the forces that affect overall performance of the economy, studying the determinants of economic activity and measures of economic performance. In addition, students explore specific current economic problems facing the United States, public policies instituted to deal with problems and repercussions of some of these policies on world economics.


Econometrics

ECON2650 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23145

Staff

This course is designed to build basic skills in applying statistical methods in economics. More specifically, this course will introduce a set of analytical tools to build econometric models, test results statistically and do the forecast. We will start with how to generate and correctly interpret ordinary least squares regression estimates, then briefly introduce empirical methods to deal with time series data, and finally apply tools and methodology learned in this course to practical problems.


English

Introduction to Composition

ENG1000 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23392

Peggy Kocoras

Focuses on the writing process: prewriting, writing and rewriting. Discussion and writing activities will include all steps of the writing process beginning with developing ideas and carried through organizing, writing and editing. Students will experiment with different techniques and learn to adapt to different college writing situations.


Introduction to Literature

ENG1020 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23199

Staff

Literature is, generally speaking, about how people cope with the joys and challenges life throws their way. This course is about the genres (structures) select writers chose to tell those stories as well as their various storytelling styles. The texts show different ways that ideas and emotions can be expressed, which are good lessons for writers as well as readers. We'll study fiction in three forms-short stories, a novel, and a film-plus poetry and plays.


Children's Literature

ENG1670 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23138

Joan Burkhardt

No doubt everyone has a children's book they remember loving or having a particular impact. When books appeal to a child's interests in natural, interesting ways, they develop a relationship with literature that will last a lifetime. Students will learn how to recognize best literature for children, compile a children's literature book summary, participate in discussions of the genre, and create an original example of literature for children.


Mythologies

ENG2050 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23116

Staff

The purpose of this course is to expose students to various systems of myth from a number of global cultures. We will examine both the similarities and differences of the myths and consider why this is so. In addition, we also will examine the idea of mythic thinking, or consciousness, and why such forms of thought and image are deemed necessary for the psychological and moral health of the cultures in which they form an inherent, and crucial part.


Modern Monsters: The Serial Killer in Literature and Film

ENG2420 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23122

Jennifer Plante

The genre of serial killer fiction is a direct descendent of Gothic fiction, with the serial killers as updated models of Gothic villains. Like their Gothic predecessors, fictional serial killers are mythologized, folkorized and, in some cases, supernaturalized. Beginning with Psycho, students will critically analyze serial killer fiction novels and films of the mid-20th century to the present while investigating the following themes: American notions and expressions of individuality; the sociopolitical climate in which the serial killer is defined and the ways in which the narratives criticize this climate; changing notions of gender roles and anxieties therein; sexual anxieties; the expressions of cultural desires; and how myth informs the serial killer narratives. Prerequisite: VE fulfilled.


Environmental Studies

Sustainability and the Sacred

ES1970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23136

Rachael Shea

Indigenous cultures relied on three basic concepts to live sustainably: community, exchange and relationship. In this course we will experience and explore these three concepts. The interconnectedness of all life - the sacred - is the "technology" which lay at the heart of all indigenous cultures. It is all available to each of us still. Connecting to the plants, the animal kingdom, and one another as equals bring the tools we need to embrace earth changes and all that the future holds. Through this course you will be empowered to engage with Sustainability on your own terms. Please be advised that some class meetings will take place outdoors.


Film

Melting Pot or Salad Bowl: A Film Exploration of Multicultural America

FILM1550 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23388

Nancye Araneo

People all over the world base their opinions of the United States on what they see in American films. What do Hollywood movies say about the culture of the United States? Are they an accurate portrayal of the country and its culture? This course will examine the history and culture of the United States as presented in film.


Modern Monsters: The Serial Killer in Literature and Film

FILM2420 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23123

Jennifer Plante

The genre of serial killer fiction is a direct descendent of Gothic fiction, with the serial killers as updated models of Gothic villains. Like their Gothic predecessors, fictional serial killers are mythologized, folkorized and, in some cases, supernaturalized. Beginning with Psycho, students will critically analyze serial killer fiction novels and films of the mid-20th century to the present while investigating the following themes: American notions and expressions of individuality; the sociopolitical climate in which the serial killer is defined and the ways in which the narratives criticize this climate; changing notions of gender roles and anxieties therein; sexual anxieties; the expressions of cultural desires; and how myth informs the serial killer narratives. Prerequisite: VE fulfilled.


Human Resource Development

Effective Speaking and Presenting

HRD1210 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23381

Martin Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Human Resource Management

HRD1240 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23379

David Everitt

As organizations recognize the value of effectively managing their human resources, professionals at all levels of the organization are expected to develop and refine their HR skills. This course will provide an historical time-line of the evolution of human resource management and an overview of the various human resource management functions to include; talent acquisition, compensation, benefits, talent management, organizational development, compliance and more.


Principles of Management

HRD1530 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23193

Staff

Introduces the fundamental managerial functions of planning, organizing, lending and controlling. Through an examination of the major motivational theories of management, we will work to increase our awareness of the personal skills required to be a manager and learn to apply managerial planning, and organizing processes as well as design a control system to measure results.


Organizational Behavior

HRD2020 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23385

Staff

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Interpersonal Communication

HRD2180 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23410

Erin Dolan

This course will utilize theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop interpersonal communication competence and better understand its role in the relationship context. Specific areas of study include: relationship building and maintenance, intercultural communication, conflict management and interpersonal communications in the organization.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

HRD2360 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23395

Staff

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Interdisciplinary

Melting Pot or Salad Bowl: A Film Exploration of Multicultural America

IDND1550 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23390

Nancye Araneo

People all over the world base their opinions of the United States on what they see in American films. What do Hollywood movies say about the culture of the United States? Are they an accurate portrayal of the country and its culture? This course will examine the history and culture of the United States as presented in film.


Reading the Bible as Literature

IDND1630 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23126

Staff

This course is a tour of the major themes, characters, events, and genres of the Bible and offers an interpretive framework by which to read the Judeo-Christian Scriptures as one unified work of literature. It will also consider the wider historical context of Biblical stories and events. It assumes no prior knowledge of the Bible, but will require students to interact with the biblical material by reading significant portions of it from each of its different genres. The readings, discussions, and presentations will challenge students to let the Bible speak for itself, and draw their own conclusions accordingly.


Children's Literature

IDND1670 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23139

Joan Burkhardt

No doubt everyone has a children's book they remember loving or having a particular impact. When books appeal to a child's interests in natural, interesting ways, they develop a relationship with literature that will last a lifetime. Students will learn how to recognize best literature for children, compile a children's literature book summary, participate in discussions of the genre, and create an original example of literature for children.


International and Comparative Studies

Economics and the World Economy

INTL1010 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23399

Staff

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


Melting Pot or Salad Bowl: A Film Exploration of Multicultural America

INTL1550 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23389

Nancye Araneo

People all over the world base their opinions of the United States on what they see in American films. What do Hollywood movies say about the culture of the United States? Are they an accurate portrayal of the country and its culture? This course will examine the history and culture of the United States as presented in film.


Reading The Bible as Literature

INTL1630 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23127

Staff

This course is a tour of the major themes, characters, events, and genres of the Bible and offers an interpretive framework by which to read the Judeo-Christian Scriptures as one unified work of literature. It will also consider the wider historical context of Biblical stories and events. It assumes no prior knowledge of the Bible, but will require students to interact with the biblical material by reading significant portions of it from each of its different genres. The readings, discussions, and presentations will challenge students to let the Bible speak for itself, and draw their own conclusions accordingly.


Sustainability and the Sacred

INTL1970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23137

Rachael Shea

Indigenous cultures relied on three basic concepts to live sustainably: community, exchange and relationship. In this course we will experience and explore these three concepts. The interconnectedness of all life - the sacred - is the "technology" which lay at the heart of all indigenous cultures. It is all available to each of us still. Connecting to the plants, the animal kingdom, and one another as equals bring the tools we need to embrace earth changes and all that the future holds. Through this course you will be empowered to engage with Sustainability on your own terms. Please be advised that some class meetings will take place outdoors.


Mathematics

Introduction to Mathematics I

MATH1010 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23187

Brian Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topics--from such areas as trigonometry and precalculus--are considered.


Introduction to Mathematics II

MATH1020 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23188

Brian Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topics--from such areas as trigonometry and precalculus--are considered.


Introduction to Mathematics III

MATH1030 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23189

Brian Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topics--from such areas as trigonometry and precalculus--are considered.


Precalculus

MATH1110 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23113

Staff

Intended for students going on to calculus. Topics include coordinate geometry, functions, and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions and trigonometry. A solid grasp of elementary algebra is assumed.


Calculus I

MATH1200 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23165

Germinal Isern

Topics include: functions, limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, continuity, related-rates problems, maximum-minimum problems, definition of integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus.


Statistics

MATH1470 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23230

Staff

Students have the opportunity to learn the rationale behind the fundamental areas of descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as the mechanics involved with each: graphic representation of data, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square, regression and correlation and nonparametric statistics.


Music

Music in the Community

MUSC1070 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23223

Staff


Organizational Behavior

PA2020 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23386

Staff

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

PA2360 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23135

Staff

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Philosophy

Professional Ethics

PHIL1310 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23156

David Flesche

Investigates moral problems that arise in-and-about-the world of business. The class discusses ethical issues in advertising, the moral status of affirmative action programs and the responsibilities of business toward the environment. Each student is expected to articulate the different sides of the issues and to defend his/her own views in discussion and in writing.


Social and Political Philosophy

PHIL1320 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23194

Staff

Why do we live in a society and what kind of reasons can justify the existence of states? What is the most ideal form of government? What obligations, fundamental rights and liberties do we have? Is statehood necessarily immoral? What moral constraints should any form of government satisfy? Should wealth be distributed over the members of the society or should property right be sacred and unquestionable? These are some of the most fundamental questions of social and political philosophy. We will consider a wide range of historical and contemporary political theories that attempt to answer these questions. This course is designed to help you form your own political views and understand their historical roots and the arguments for and against them.


THE MEANING OF LIFE

PHIL2010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23550

Staff


Psychology

Introduction to Clinical & Counseling Psychology

PSYC1480 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23118

Daniel Lambert

Provides an overview of psychologists' role in contemporary culture. This course critically examines various theories of cognitive, educational and personality assessment. It reviews theories of intervention and change with attention to their assumptions concerning "normal" and normative behavior and assesses current directions in health psychology.


Psychology of Personality

PSYC1720 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23147

Margaret Campbell

Sometimes different people act the same way in the same situation, but other times, the situation affects people differently. What accounts for these individual differences? Why are some people outgoing in unfamiliar situations, and others are shy? Why are some people more prone to aggression, while others tend to be peacemakers? How do we become who we are? Personality psychology concerns individual differences in behavior, thought, and feeling patterns as well as the processes within a person that lead to stability in personality. This course will explore various factors that affect personality, including biological, developmental, and situational factors. We will focus on major personality theorists (such as Freud, Jung, Adler, Fromm, Maslow, etc.) and theories, as well as more recent work in personality psychology.


Diagnosis and Treatment of Persons With Co-occuring Disorders

PSYC2100 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23369

Staff

Explores the diagnostic and treatment challenges posed by co-occuring mental illness and substance abuse disorders. There will be strong emphasis on increasing awareness of self and others, as well as development of clinical applications. Concepts and theories behind addictive and psychiatric disorders and their treatment process will be covered.


Psychology of Human Learning

PSYC2300 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23120

Staff

Emphasizes both theoretical understanding and practical application of theories and research findigs. Topics include how people process information in daily living, the use of learning style in educational methods and career choice, and the effect of emotions on perception and memory.


Social Services

The Final Chapter: A Study of Death and Dying

SCSV1090 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23130

Staff

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.


Our Aging Society

SCSV1180 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23128

Staff

In the United States today there are more older people in the population than ever before. Many issues offer new challenges as one enters middle and later life but is there a way "successful aging" can be accomplished? With all of these challenges can one truly grow old gracefully? Topics such as diet, exercise, pensions, family life, and housing will be explored. Theories of the aging process will be discussed as we review the study of aging: past, present and future.


Drugs and Crime in Society

SCSV1240 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23153

Timothy O'Connor

The physiological, psychological and sociological effects of licit and illicit drugs in society will be studied. A law enforcement perspective into the so called "war on drugs", the success and failures of various drug prevention and replacement therapy programs as well as the roadblock to recovery being created by the criminal justice system and insurance companies will be discussed. Contemporary topics such as whether addiction is a choice or a disease, the pros and cons of legalization and the issue of medicinal marijuana will also be debated.


Juvenile Delinquency

SCSV2060 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23155

Staff

An examination of delinquency, the suspected causes of delinquent behavior, and the environmental influences of youthful misbehavior. The use of pretrial detention, shock incarceration, mandatory sentencing, and gang control efforts will be analyzed. Topics such as the role of the courts and police, status offenders, juvenile corrections, transfer of juvenile to adult courts and their impact on the Juvenile Justice system are covered.


Children in Crisis

SCSV2080 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23125

Donald Moran

Explores the sensitive issues surrounding the increasing number of abused children in contemporary American culture. The biological, psychological and sociological factors affecting child abuse are used as the broad conceptual framework for prevention, identification and treatment. Focuses on the etiology of child abuse as well as treatment and the law.


Interpersonal Communication

SCSV2180 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 23403

Erin Dolan

This course will utilize theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop interpersonal communication competence and better understand its role in the relationship context. Specific areas of study include: relationship building and maintenance, intercultural communication, conflict management and interpersonal communications in the organization.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

SCSV2360 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23134

Staff

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Sociology

The Final Chapter: A Study in Death and Dying

SOC1090 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23131

Staff

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.


Our Aging Society

SOC1180 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23129

Staff

In the United States today there are more older people in the population than ever before. Many issues offer new challenges as one enters middle and later life but is there a way "successful aging" can be accomplished? With all of these challenges can one truly grow old gracefully? Topics such as diet, exercise, pensions, family life, and housing will be explored. Theories of the aging process will be discussed as we review the study of aging: past, present and future.


Juvenile Delinquency

SOC2210 TBA    Section: 1
CRN: 23154

Staff

An examination of delinquency, the suspected causes of delinquent behavior, and the environmental influences of youthful misbehavior. The use of pretrial detention, shock incarceration, mandatory sentencing, and gang control efforts will be analyzed. Topics such as the role of the courts and police, status offenders, juvenile corrections, transfer of juvenile to adult courts and their impact on the Juvenile Justice system are covered.