College of Professional and Continuing Education

Spring Undergraduate Courses - 2015

For CRN's see: Spring 2015 Schedule

Art

Basic Drawing

ART1010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34319

L. Johnson

Introduces students to basic drawing concepts such as: line, volume, shape, perspective, value and composition. There will be a strong emphasis on observational methods to learn these basic concepts. Requires no previous experience. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


Techniques of Ceramics

ART1080 T 0330p-0630p    Section: 1
CRN: 33240

L. Freedman

Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, sculptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Techniques of Ceramics

ART1080 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 2
CRN: 33242

L. Freedman

Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, sculptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Clay and Fiber

ART1140 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33241

L. Freedman

Explores the historical, traditional and contemporary artistic applications of these two plastic mediums. Students will gain a working knowledge of traditional and experimental ceramic and fiber techniques. Design quality will be stressed throughout as a fundamental aspect of good craftsmanship. Students will gain an understanding of the artistic heritage inherent in crafts of the past and present. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Introduction to Digital Photography

ART1160 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33292

R. Loischild

Designed to work artistically within a computer-mediated environment, this course is intended as a venue for discussing the history, current practices and social value of technology-based creativity in the field of photography. You will learn to use the digital camera, Adobe Photoshop, scanners and printers to complete the digital workflow. Students must have a digital camera and a digital SLR is strongly suggested. Material fee: $100.00.


Essentials of Modern Art

ART1780 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34528

J. Hayes-Nikas

In this course we will focus on demystifying the all too often intimidating and misunderstood art of the 20th century; and making it rather palatable and quite easy to approach. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary cultural trends, the course then explores the roots of these trends by turning to the Modernist period. After some training in 'aesthetic scanning'; a method for looking at writing about and discussing art; students will have the opportunity to study the connections with the major artistic movements from Impressionism through-to Post-Modern performance, informational, word, installation, and street art.


Photography Projects

ART2000 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33274

S. DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Introductory and Intermediate Photography.


Intermediate Photography Projects

ART2100 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33275

S. DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Photography Projects.


Advanced Photography Projects

ART2200 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33276

S. DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography Projects.


American Sign Language

Beginning American Sign Language II

ASL1020 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33227

J. Dunn

A continuation of American Sign Language (ASL) I, including grammar, basic vocabulary, manual alphabets/numbers and visual gestural communication. ASL written code will also be covered.


American Sign Language IV

ASL1040 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33223

J. Dunn

A continuation of ASL III, focusing on further development of visual-spatial orientation and manipulation skills, sign vocabulary and conversational skills. Students will continue to work on strategies for opening, sustaining and closing general conversation on a range of topics. They will also further develop the ability to question, narrate and give increasingly detailed description of activities, interactions, plans and directions.


Criminal Justice

Corrections in America

CJ1200 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33245

G. White

Provides the student with an in-depth look at modern prisons, through a study of the Massachusetts Correctional System. Topics such as the history of jails and prisons, overcrowding, prison violence and the AIDS epidemic will be discussed. Students will tour a local correctional facility to learn first hand about a rapidly deteriorating prison system.


Drugs in Society II

CJ1250 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34321

T. O'Connor

This course is a continuation of Drugs in Society I. Students further explore the background and nature of drug abuse, including illicit, prescription and over the counter drugs. Psychological and physiological effects will be studied in detail as well as the social ramifications and legal responses to the problem. In this continuation of Drugs in Society the students will learn about the different drug treatment programs including abstinence based and replacement therapy programs. A law enforcement perspective into the continuing War on Drugs will be reviewed including the latest patterns and trends in drug trafficking.


Organized Crime

CJ1990 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33288

E. Karcasinas

From Capone to Bulger and beyond, we will cover the history and development of organized crime as it has evolved throughout the world. We will examine law enforcements of technology and other state of the art measures to enhance smuggling and other activities in their efforts to compromise law enforcement and governments.


Criminology

CJ2010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34318

D. Moran

Analyzes the realities of contemporary crime as a social phenomenon, focusing on types and patterns of crimes, their causes and their impact upon todays community. Students examine the effectiveness, practicality and ramifications of attempts to solve social problems and control crime by passing new laws. Discussions include the composition, background and everyday behavior of adult offenders, as well as the various problems they create for the court system and society. Also examines new concepts and sentencing options designed to reduce crime and deal effectively with criminals.


A Study of Violent Crime

CJ2020 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33229

D. Moran

Surveys the nature and scope of violent crime, including domestic violence, and examines the social structures in our society that cultivate and allow violence to exist. Focus is on criminal behavior and its legal and sociological consequences. The course analyzes the backgrounds and identifies characteristics of violent criminals, such as the Boston Strangler, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer, and Pamela Smart. Also included is an examination of the Stuart murder case.


Effective Speaking and Presenting

COMM1210 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33238

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

COMM1770 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33427

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

COMM2360 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33305

J. Greenhalgh

Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Computer Science

Python Programming

CSCI1090 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34325

H. Zhu

This course provides a general introduction to the Python programming language. Topics include the Python programming environment; elements of the language, such as functions, conditionals, recursions, iterations, and file operations; basic data types, such as lists and dictionaries; and concepts of classes and objects.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

CSCI1770 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33426

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Ethics in Information Technology

CSCI2000 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34388

G. Isern

This course offers extensive and topical coverage of the legal, ethical, and societal impications of information technology. Students will learn about issues such as file sharing, infringement of intellectual property, security risks, Internet crime, identity theft, employer suveillance, privacy, compliance, social networking, and ethics of IT corporations. Students will gain an excellent foundation in ethical decision making for current and future business managers and IT professionals.


Computer Forensics

CSCI2270 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34323

G. Isern

Presents methods to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation, beginning with a discussion of ethics while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification. Students should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises.


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

CSCI2970 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34308

T. Smieszek

An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.


Economics

Economics and the World Economy

ECON1010 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33281

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


English

Intermediate Composition

ENG1150 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33237

N. Araneo

Competent expository writing skills are mandatory for college and professional success. Clarity, focus, development, organization, grammar and style are emphasized in this workshop-style course. Students write various types of essays to expand their methods of expression, increase their basic writing skills and experiment with individual writing styles. The course also covers the full process of researching, organizing, writing and documenting research papers.


Fiction on the Fringe: Crimes, Addictions and Psychoses

ENG2140 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33236

J. Plante

An examination of selected 20th century works of fiction that deal with the social or psychological outcast(s). We will focus on each author's construction of narrative, point of view, characterization, language and imagery. Questions regarding alternative versus traditional morality, the differentiation between marginal versus mainstream ethos will also be central to our investigations. Works studied include: "Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas", "Girl Interrupted", "American Psycho", "One Flew Over the Cukoo's Nest" and "Lolita."


Environmental Studies

Sustainability and the Sacred

ES1970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33193

R. Shea

Indigenous cultures relied on three basic concepts to live sustainably: community, exchange and relationship. In this course we will experience and explore these three concepts. The interconnectedness of all life - the sacred - is the "technology" which lay at the heart of all indigenous cultures. It is all available to each of us still. Connecting to the plants, the animal kingdom, and one another as equals bring the tools we need to embrace earth changes and all that the future holds. Through this course you will be empowered to engage with Sustainability on your own terms. Please be advised that some class meetings will take place outdoors.


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

ES2750 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33425

T. Smieszek

An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.


Human Resource Development

Effective Speaking and Presenting

HRD1210 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33239

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


International and Comparative Studies

Economics and the World Economy

INTL1010 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33282

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


Essentials of Modern Art

INTL1780 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34529

J. Hayes-Nikas

In this course we will focus on demystifying the all too often intimidating and misunderstood art of the 20th century; and making it rather palatable and quite easy to approach. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary cultural trends, the course then explores the roots of these trends by turning to the Modernist period. After some training in 'aesthetic scanning'; a method for looking at writing about and discussing art; students will have the opportunity to study the connections with the major artistic movements from Impressionism through-to Post-Modern performance, informational, word, installation, and street art.


Sustainability and the Sacred

INTL1970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33194

R. Shea

Indigenous cultures relied on three basic concepts to live sustainably: community, exchange and relationship. In this course we will experience and explore these three concepts. The interconnectedness of all life - the sacred - is the "technology" which lay at the heart of all indigenous cultures. It is all available to each of us still. Connecting to the plants, the animal kingdom, and one another as equals bring the tools we need to embrace earth changes and all that the future holds. Through this course you will be empowered to engage with Sustainability on your own terms. Please be advised that some class meetings will take place outdoors.


Mathematics

Introduction to Mathematics I

MATH1010 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34381

B. Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topics--from such areas as trigonometry and precalculus--are considered.


Introduction to Mathematics II

MATH1020 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34382

B. Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topics--from such areas as trigonometry and precalculus--are considered. Prerequisite: Introduction to Mathematics I.


Introduction to Mathematics III

MATH1030 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34383

B. Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topicsfrom such areas as trigonometry and precalculusare considered. Prerequiste: Introduction to Mathematics II.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

PA2360 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33198

J. Greenhalgh

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Psychology

Recovery and Relapse Prevention in Mental Illness and Addiction

PSYC2200 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33234

D. Lambert

Mental Health and Addiction Services are increasingly organized according to principles of recovery outlined in the President's New Freedom Commission Report. The course provides an overview of recovery-oriented approaches to care, psychosocial rehabilitation and relapse prevention. Students will be introduced to stages-of-change theory, motivational interviewing, Cognitive Behavior Therapy based skills and cognitive-behavioral analysis as applied to relapse cycles. The second half of the course will explore problem-specific evidence-based interventions that are consistent with recovery principles.


Social Services

Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

SCSV2360 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33197

J. Greenhalgh

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Sociology

Introduction to Sociology

SOC1010 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34315

J. Nowicki

Introduces the basic concepts in the field of sociology with emphasis upon the application of these concepts to the understanding of the American institutions of politics, economics, religion, education, marriage and family.