College of Professional and Continuing Education

Spring Undergraduate Courses - 2015

For CRN's see: Spring 2015 Schedule

Art

Basic Drawing

ART1010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34319

L. Johnson

Introduces students to basic drawing concepts such as: line, volume, shape, perspective, value and composition. There will be a strong emphasis on observational methods to learn these basic concepts. Requires no previous experience. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own supplies.


Introduction to Photography

ART1030 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34320

R. Loischild

Introduces students to the medium of photography as an art form and means of communication. The zone system, camera functions, composition and printing are covered in detail. Class discussion on contemporary and historical views of photography are encouraged. In this studio/laboratory course, students are in the darkroom developing black and white film and printing archival fiberbase silver prints. By course completion, students produce a fine small portfolio of prints. Must have 35 mm camera capable of manual settings. Material fee: $50.00.


Techniques of Ceramics

ART1080 T 0330p-0630p    Section: 1
CRN: 33240

L. Freedman

Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, sculptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Techniques of Ceramics

ART1080 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 2
CRN: 33242

L. Freedman

Traditional and experimental ceramic techniques will be explored. Design quality will be emphasized in the production of functional, sculptural, and architectural ceramic pieces. Individual problem solving will be stressed. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Clay and Fiber

ART1140 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33241

L. Freedman

Explores the historical, traditional and contemporary artistic applications of these two plastic mediums. Students will gain a working knowledge of traditional and experimental ceramic and fiber techniques. Design quality will be stressed throughout as a fundamental aspect of good craftsmanship. Students will gain an understanding of the artistic heritage inherent in crafts of the past and present. Material fee: $60.00 payable to Craft Studio on first night of class.


Introduction to Digital Photography

ART1160 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33292

R. Loischild

Designed to work artistically within a computer-mediated environment, this course is intended as a venue for discussing the history, current practices and social value of technology-based creativity in the field of photography. You will learn to use the digital camera, Adobe Photoshop, scanners and printers to complete the digital workflow. Students must have a digital camera and a digital SLR is strongly suggested. Material fee: $100.00.


Essentials of Modern Art

ART1780 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34528

J. Hayes-Nikas

In this course we will focus on demystifying the all too often intimidating and misunderstood art of the 20th century; and making it rather palatable and quite easy to approach. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary cultural trends, the course then explores the roots of these trends by turning to the Modernist period. After some training in 'aesthetic scanning'; a method for looking at writing about and discussing art; students will have the opportunity to study the connections with the major artistic movements from Impressionism through-to Post-Modern performance, informational, word, installation, and street art.


Photography Projects

ART2000 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33274

S. DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Introductory and Intermediate Photography.


Intermediate Photography Projects

ART2100 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33275

S. DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Photography Projects.


Advanced Photography Projects

ART2200 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33276

S. DiRado

An advanced photography course for the individual who has made a commitment to the medium. Students will self-design a semester long project, and can explore one of many themes including: journalism, landscape, architecture, portraits, still life, personal images and alternative processes. This course is based on weekly critiques that are designed to encourage and stimulate students to develop a personal style. The goal for the semester is to conclude with a comprehensive portfolio. Some class meetings will be held off campus. Material fee: $100.00. Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography Projects.


American Sign Language

Beginning American Sign Language II

ASL1020 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33227

J. Dunn

A continuation of American Sign Language (ASL) I, including grammar, basic vocabulary, manual alphabets/numbers and visual gestural communication. ASL written code will also be covered.


American Sign Language IV

ASL1040 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33223

J. Dunn

A continuation of ASL III, focusing on further development of visual-spatial orientation and manipulation skills, sign vocabulary and conversational skills. Students will continue to work on strategies for opening, sustaining and closing general conversation on a range of topics. They will also further develop the ability to question, narrate and give increasingly detailed description of activities, interactions, plans and directions.


Criminal Justice

Corrections in America

CJ1200 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33245

G. White

Provides the student with an in-depth look at modern prisons, through a study of the Massachusetts Correctional System. Topics such as the history of jails and prisons, overcrowding, prison violence and the AIDS epidemic will be discussed. Students will tour a local correctional facility to learn first hand about a rapidly deteriorating prison system.


Drugs in Society II

CJ1250 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34321

T. O'Connor

This course is a continuation of Drugs in Society I. Students further explore the background and nature of drug abuse, including illicit, prescription and over the counter drugs. Psychological and physiological effects will be studied in detail as well as the social ramifications and legal responses to the problem. In this continuation of Drugs in Society the students will learn about the different drug treatment programs including abstinence based and replacement therapy programs. A law enforcement perspective into the continuing War on Drugs will be reviewed including the latest patterns and trends in drug trafficking.


Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

CJ1960 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34389

C. Gold

This course provides a broad overview of forensic anthropology-an applied field of biological anthropology. Forensic anthropology is the application of the science of physical/biological anthropology to the legal process. The identification of skeletal human remains is important for both legal and humanitarian reasons. Forensic anthropologists work to determine age, sex, ancestry, stature and unique features from the skeleton. While proficiency in forensic methods will not be the focus of this course, general identification techniques will be addressed. A combination of readings from the assigned textbook and articles assigned by the instructor will form the basis of class lecture and discussion.


Contemporary Criminal Procedure

CJ1970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34416

E. Karcasinas

What are the rights of someone accused of a crime? What protections do you have to be free from governmental intrusions into your home, car or computer? We will examine both federal and state constitutional provisions that provide the framework under which law enforcement must operate. This will include the right to an attorney, the need for law enforcement to obtain a search warrant to gather evidence and the limits on whether statements can be used against you in a criminal proceeding.


Organized Crime

CJ1990 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33288

E. Karcasinas

From Capone to Bulger and beyond, we will cover the history and development of organized crime as it has evolved throughout the world. We will examine law enforcements of technology and other state of the art measures to enhance smuggling and other activities in their efforts to compromise law enforcement and governments.


Crime and Deviance

CJ2000 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33270

T. O'Connor

Examines and debates definitions of crime and deviance, studying: street, corporate, organized and political crime; drug use; mental illness; crimes by and against women; and other forms of crime and deviance. Also explored are the social, political and economic conditions that lead to crime and deviance and the social response to them.


Criminology

CJ2010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34318

D. Moran

Analyzes the realities of contemporary crime as a social phenomenon, focusing on types and patterns of crimes, their causes and their impact upon todays community. Students examine the effectiveness, practicality and ramifications of attempts to solve social problems and control crime by passing new laws. Discussions include the composition, background and everyday behavior of adult offenders, as well as the various problems they create for the court system and society. Also examines new concepts and sentencing options designed to reduce crime and deal effectively with criminals.


A Study of Violent Crime

CJ2020 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33229

D. Moran

Surveys the nature and scope of violent crime, including domestic violence, and examines the social structures in our society that cultivate and allow violence to exist. Focus is on criminal behavior and its legal and sociological consequences. The course analyzes the backgrounds and identifies characteristics of violent criminals, such as the Boston Strangler, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer, and Pamela Smart. Also included is an examination of the Stuart murder case.


Business Law

CJ2170 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34322

J. Horan

A study of the legal basis of business and the principles of statutory and common law as they affect business relationships. Emphasis is on those areas of the law commonly encountered by the business manager such as contract negotiation and provisions, the Uniform Commercial Code, government regulations, consumer protection and tort liability, property, partnerships, corporations and descendents estate and employment law.


Effective Speaking and Presenting

COMM1210 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33238

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Introduction to Advertising

COMM1340 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34316

J. Mitchell

Analysis and implementation of basic advertising principles. Reading, class discussion, research and in-class workshops are required.


Graphic Design for the Web

COMM1350 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34310

J. Pratt

Introduces the many aspects of graphic design for use on the Internet through the use of Adobe Photoshop and other graphic software tools. Techniques for graphics creation, animation and file conversion are covered. Understanding of HTML and basic use of IBM compatible computers is a requirement.


Principles of Management

COMM1530 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34384

P. Coute

Introduces the fundamental managerial of functions planning, organizing, lending and controlling. Through an examination of the major motivational theories of management, we will work to increase our awareness of the personal skills required to be a manager and learn to apply managerial planning, and organizing processes as well as design a control system to measure results.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

COMM1770 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33427

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Organizational Behavior

COMM2020 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34312

J. Lambert

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Interpersonal Communication

COMM2180 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34376

E. Dolan

This course will utilize theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop interpersonal communication competence and better understand its role in the relationship context. Specific areas of study include: relationship building and maintenance, intercultural communication, conflict management and interpersonal communications in the organization.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

COMM2360 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33305

J. Greenhalgh

Students develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Computer Science

Introduction to Computing

CSCI1010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34387

P. Coute

Introduces computer hardware systems and software applications. This is a hands-on course that teaches the MS operating system and an introductory to intermediate level of the Microsoft Office Suite application: Word (word processing), Excel (spreadsheets), PowerPoint (presentations) and Access (database). Skills learned are directly usable in the workplace and other coursework. No prior computer experience is necessary.


Python Programming

CSCI1090 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34325

H. Zhu

This course provides a general introduction to the Python programming language. Topics include the Python programming environment; elements of the language, such as functions, conditionals, recursions, iterations, and file operations; basic data types, such as lists and dictionaries; and concepts of classes and objects.


Graphic Design for the Web

CSCI1350 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34309

J. Pratt

Introduces the many aspects of graphic design for use on the Internet through the use of Adobe Photoshop and other graphic software tools. Techniques for graphics creation, animation and file conversion are covered. Understanding of HTML and basic use of IBM compatible computers is a requirement.


Introduction to Management Information Systems

CSCI1770 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33426

D. Wadsworth

Introduces computers and information technology as a resource for management. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of information terminology and a conceptual foundation of information systems for management, society and individuals.


Ethics in Information Technology

CSCI2000 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34388

G. Isern

This course offers extensive and topical coverage of the legal, ethical, and societal impications of information technology. Students will learn about issues such as file sharing, infringement of intellectual property, security risks, Internet crime, identity theft, employer suveillance, privacy, compliance, social networking, and ethics of IT corporations. Students will gain an excellent foundation in ethical decision making for current and future business managers and IT professionals.


Computer Forensics

CSCI2270 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34323

G. Isern

Presents methods to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation, beginning with a discussion of ethics while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification. Students should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises.


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

CSCI2970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34308

T. Smieszek

An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.


Economics

Economics and the World Economy

ECON1010 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33281

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


Microeconomics

ECON2051 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34349

A. Bukhatwa

Describes and analyzes how a market-oriented economy functions in answering basic economic concerns. Interspersed with theory, the course focuses on particular examples that demonstrate the use of microeconomics to solve problems faced by decision makers in both the private and public sectors.


Macroeconomics

ECON2052 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34350

C. Pan

Focuses on the forces that affect overall performance of the economy, studying the determinants of economic activity and measures of economic performance. In addition, students explore specific current economic problems facing the United States, public policies instituted to deal with problems and repercussions of some of these policies on world economics.


Introduction to International Trade

ECON2070 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34326

G. Somasse

Why and what do countries trade? Do they benefit from trade? What are tariffs and quotas? Within the framework for the study of international trade that this course will provide, we will examine various trade theories (Ricardian, Heckscher-Ohlin, etc.), welfare implications of trade policies, global trading arrangements (including GATT & WTO) and other issues pertinent to international trade. Prerequisite:Principles of Economics


English

Intermediate Composition

ENG1150 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33237

N. Araneo

Competent expository writing skills are mandatory for college and professional success. Clarity, focus, development, organization, grammar and style are emphasized in this workshop-style course. Students write various types of essays to expand their methods of expression, increase their basic writing skills and experiment with individual writing styles. The course also covers the full process of researching, organizing, writing and documenting research papers.


Fiction on the Fringe: Crimes, Addictions and Psychoses

ENG2140 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33236

J. Plante

An examination of selected 20th century works of fiction that deal with the social or psychological outcast(s). We will focus on each author's construction of narrative, point of view, characterization, language and imagery. Questions regarding alternative versus traditional morality, the differentiation between marginal versus mainstream ethos will also be central to our investigations. Works studied include: "Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas", "Girl Interrupted", "American Psycho", "One Flew Over the Cukoo's Nest" and "Lolita."


Environmental Studies

Sustainability and the Sacred

ES1970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33193

R. Shea

Indigenous cultures relied on three basic concepts to live sustainably: community, exchange and relationship. In this course we will experience and explore these three concepts. The interconnectedness of all life - the sacred - is the "technology" which lay at the heart of all indigenous cultures. It is all available to each of us still. Connecting to the plants, the animal kingdom, and one another as equals bring the tools we need to embrace earth changes and all that the future holds. Through this course you will be empowered to engage with Sustainability on your own terms. Please be advised that some class meetings will take place outdoors.


Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

ES2750 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33425

T. Smieszek

An introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Current programs for GIS are introduced and students are encouraged to pursue independent work.


History

Twentieth Century Russia: 1861 to Present

HIST1570 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34327

C. Wilson

This interdisciplinary survey course focuses on the major political, intellectual, ideological, social and cultural forces that shaped Soviet Russia during the pre- and post-revolutionary movement and the politics of the autocracy to the Brezhnev regime in the 1970s. Themes include the Russian autocracy, the ideology of Marxism-Leninism, the origins of the Cold War, the rise of Khrushchev, Brezhnev and Gorbachev, de-Stalinization and Soviet foreign policy. Students also examine a series of more contemporary topics of the Commonwealth in transition.


Rise, Fall and Rebirth: Germany in the 20th Century

HIST2210 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34525

M. Geheran

Germany has stood at the center of world events throughout the twentieth century; its crises have profoundly impacted Europe and the United States for over the past hundred years. Germans helping plunge Europe into Worl War I, were responsible for the Second World War, and perpetrated the Holocaust. Beginning with the transformation of 19th century Germany into an industrial world power with a thriving, liberal middle-class, we will examine Germans' role in World War One, the Weimar Republic, and during National Socialism and the Holocaust. We will pay particular attention to the "catastrophe" that was German history from 1914-1945, asking whether Germany developed along a special path (Sonderweg), what made possible the rise of Hitler, yet remaining open to the possibilities of the Weimar Republic. We will then explore the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany and the fall of the Iron Curtain, and ask how Germans successfully transitioned from autocracy to democracy after 1945. After 1945, West Germany, a NATO memeber, developed into one of the strongest economies in the world, while East Germany, part of the Warsaw Pact, became one of the most repressive regimes in Europe. Today, Germany's stability is at the heart of a new post-Cold War Europe and the driving force behind the European Union.


Human Resource Development

Effective Speaking and Presenting

HRD1210 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33239

M. Richman

Prepares participants for the challenges of effectively speaking to groups and individuals, including culturally diverse audiences. We examine the various types of speaking situations that participants are involved with on a regular basis.


Principles of Management

HRD1530 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34385

P. Coute

Introduces the fundamental managerial of functions planning, organizing, lending and controlling. Through an examination of the major motivational theories of management, we will work to increase our awareness of the personal skills required to be a manager and learn to apply managerial planning, and organizing processes as well as design a control system to measure results.


Organizational Behavior

HRD2020 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34313

J. Lambert

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Interpersonal Communication

HRD2180 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34377

E. Dolan

This course will utilize theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop interpersonal communication competence and better understand its role in the relationship context. Specific areas of study include: relationship building and maintenance, intercultural communication, conflict management and interpersonal communications in the organization.


Interdisciplinary

Another Way of Seeing: The World View of the Bible

IDND1630 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34379

W. Hayward

We will see how a particular way of looking at God, the world and the nature of humanity emerges by tracing the historical development of the people of Israel through to the early followers of Jesus. This way of seeing will provoke thought, challenge our own presuppositions and engage us in lively conversation about the bible and its meaning. This course assumes no prior knowledge of the Bible, but will require students to interact with the biblical material by reading significant portions of it from each of its different genres. The readings, discussions and presentations will challenge students to let the Bible speak for itself and draw their own conclusions accordingly. Students will also explore areas of personal interest and share their discoveries with the class.


International and Comparative Studies

Economics and the World Economy

INTL1010 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33282

A. Bukhatwa

The last few years have proven to all of us that what happens in one nation's economy can have major impact- good or bad- on the economies of another nation. How and why this happens is important for us to understand. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy This course, an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies, develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade.


Twentieth Century Russia: 1861 to Present

INTL1570 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34329

C. Wilson

This interdisciplinary survey course focuses on the major political, intellectual, ideological, social and cultural forces that shaped Soviet Russia during the pre- and post-revolutionary movement and the politics of the autocracy to the Brezhnev regime in the 1970s. Themes include the Russian autocracy, the ideology of Marxism-Leninism, the origins of the Cold War, the rise of Khrushchev, Brezhnev and Gorbachev, de-Stalinization and Soviet foreign policy. Students also examine a series of more contemporary topics of the Commonwealth in transition.


Another Way of Seeing; World View of the Bible

INTL1630 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34380

W. Hayward

We will see how a particular way of looking at God, the world and the nature of humanity emerges by tracing the historical development of the people of Israel through to the early followers of Jesus. This "way of seeing" will provoke thought, challenge our own presuppositions and engage us in lively conversation about the bible and its meaning.This course assumes no prior knowledge of the Bible, but will require students to interact with the biblical material by reading significant portions of it from each of its different genres. The readings, discussions and presentations will challenge students to let the Bible speak for itself and draw their own conclusions accordingly. Students will also explore areas of personal interest and share their discoveries with the class.


Essentials of Modern Art

INTL1780 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34529

J. Hayes-Nikas

In this course we will focus on demystifying the all too often intimidating and misunderstood art of the 20th century; and making it rather palatable and quite easy to approach. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary cultural trends, the course then explores the roots of these trends by turning to the Modernist period. After some training in 'aesthetic scanning'; a method for looking at writing about and discussing art; students will have the opportunity to study the connections with the major artistic movements from Impressionism through-to Post-Modern performance, informational, word, installation, and street art.


Sustainability and the Sacred

INTL1970 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33194

R. Shea

Indigenous cultures relied on three basic concepts to live sustainably: community, exchange and relationship. In this course we will experience and explore these three concepts. The interconnectedness of all life - the sacred - is the "technology" which lay at the heart of all indigenous cultures. It is all available to each of us still. Connecting to the plants, the animal kingdom, and one another as equals bring the tools we need to embrace earth changes and all that the future holds. Through this course you will be empowered to engage with Sustainability on your own terms. Please be advised that some class meetings will take place outdoors.


Rise, Fall and Rebirth: Germany in the 20th Century

INTL2210 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34526

M. Geheran

Germany has stood at the center of world events throughout the twentieth century; its crises have profoundly impacted Europe and the United States for over the past hundred years. Germans helping plunge Europe into Worl War I, were responsible for the Second World War, and perpetrated the Holocaust. Beginning with the transformation of 19th century Germany into an industrial world power with a thriving, liberal middle-class, we will examine Germans' role in World War One, the Weimar Republic, and during National Socialism and the Holocaust. We will pay particular attention to the "catastrophe" that was German history from 1914-1945, asking whether Germany developed along a special path (Sonderweg), what made possible the rise of Hitler, yet remaining open to the possibilities of the Weimar Republic. We will then explore the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany and the fall of the Iron Curtain, and ask how Germans successfully transitioned from autocracy to democracy after 1945. After 1945, West Germany, a NATO memeber, developed into one of the strongest economies in the world, while East Germany, part of the Warsaw Pact, became one of the most repressive regimes in Europe. Today, Germany's stability is at the heart of a new post-Cold War Europe and the driving force behind the European Union.


Mathematics

Introduction to Mathematics I

MATH1010 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34381

B. Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topics--from such areas as trigonometry and precalculus--are considered.


Introduction to Mathematics II

MATH1020 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34382

B. Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topics--from such areas as trigonometry and precalculus--are considered. Prerequisite: Introduction to Mathematics I.


Introduction to Mathematics III

MATH1030 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34383

B. Kondek

An individually paced course designed primarily to develop proficiency with the concepts of introductory mathematics and algebra needed for future course work. Once areas have been mastered in a test-free environment, more advanced topicsfrom such areas as trigonometry and precalculusare considered. Prerequiste: Introduction to Mathematics II.


Precalculus

MATH1110 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34317

B. Casey

Intended for students going on to calculus. Topics include coordinate geometry, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions and trigonometry. A solid grasp of elementary algebra is assumed.


Calculus I

MATH1200 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33480

B. Casey

Topics include: functions, limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, continuity, related-rates problems, maximum-minimum problems, definition of integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus.


Statistics

MATH1470 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34311

D. Thamarapani

Students have the opportunity to learn the rationale behind the fundamental areas of descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as the mechanics involved with each: graphic representation of data, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square, regression and correlation and nonparametric statistics.


Organizational Behavior

PA2020 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34314

J. Lambert

In this course we will focus on the common daily challenges facing individuals within the work place environment. Understanding these different behaviors and concepts found within the complex and diverse work environment is a critical component for survival and success in the modern organization. The specific topics of organizational structure, culture, change, motivation, group dynamics, leadership and interpersonal communication will all be addressed. The objective of this course is to give the student a better overall grasp of the organizational structure and the primary factors driving the managerial decision makers within it.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

PA2360 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33198

J. Greenhalgh

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL1000 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34324

P. Marton

Utilizing primary sources and commentary, the course introduces the student to the major schools of philosophy --idealism, realism, naturalism--through examining problems and theories in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, social philosophy and anesthetics. Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Mill and Rawls are reviewed.


The Meaning of Life

PHIL2010 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33484

D. Flesche

Questions about the meaning of life arise in literature, films and other art forms as well as in our own personal experience. In this course we will consider philosophical approaches to these questions. And consider what sort of question is being asked about life's meaning and why. Are we asking questions about an individual's own life or about human life generally? Why should we care whether human life has meaning or not? What facts about human existence raise the question in the first place? We will consider what type of answers can be given to questions about the meaning of life and will also consider whether we have a reason to regret our death, and the role of atheism, religion and morality in raising and responding to questions about the purpose of life.


Psychology

Diagnosis and Treatment of Persons With Co-occurring Disorders

PSYC2100 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34386

J. Finneran

Explores the diagnostic and treatment challenges posed by co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse disorders. There will be strong emphasis on increasing awareness of self and others, as well as development of clinical applications. Concepts and theories behind addictive and psychiatric disorders and their treatment process will be covered.


Recovery and Relapse Prevention in Mental Illness and Addiction

PSYC2200 T 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33234

D. Lambert

Mental Health and Addiction Services are increasingly organized according to principles of recovery outlined in the President's New Freedom Commission Report. The course provides an overview of recovery-oriented approaches to care, psychosocial rehabilitation and relapse prevention. Students will be introduced to stages-of-change theory, motivational interviewing, Cognitive Behavior Therapy based skills and cognitive-behavioral analysis as applied to relapse cycles. The second half of the course will explore problem-specific evidence-based interventions that are consistent with recovery principles.


Psychology of Human Motivation

PSYC2390 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33235

D. Lambert

Students evaluate the different psychological theories of motivation from a phenomenological perspective. Each theory is evaluated in terms of an experiential matrix. Assists the student in his/her attempt to make sense of what comes under the rubric of motivation. Behavior modification and management strategies commonly used in clinics and the workplace are critically examined.


Science

Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

SCIS1960 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34390

C. Gold

This course provides a broad overview of forensic anthropology-an applied field of biological anthropology. Forensic anthropology is the application of the science of physical/biological anthropology to the legal process. The identification of skeletal human remains is important for both legal and humanitarian reasons. Forensic anthropologists work to determine age, sex, ancestry, stature and unique features from the skeleton. While proficiency in forensic methods will not be the focus of this course, general identification techniques will be addressed. A combination of readings from the assigned textbook and articles assigned by the instructor will form the basis of class lecture and discussion.


Social Services

The Final Chapter: A Study of Death and Dying

SCSV1090 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33280

J. Nowicki

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.


Crime and Deviance

SCSV2010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33271

T. O'Connor

Examines and debates definitions of crime and deviance, studying: street, corporate, organized and political crime; drug use; mental illness; crimes by and against women; and other forms of crime and deviance. Also explored are the social, political and economic conditions that lead to crime and deviance and the social response to them.


Interpersonal Communication

SCSV2180 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34378

E. Dolan

This course will utilize theory and practical applications to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop interpersonal communication competence and better understand its role in the relationship context. Specific areas of study include: relationship building and maintenance, intercultural communication, conflict management and interpersonal communications in the organization.


Negotiation, Mediation and Conflict Management

SCSV2360 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33197

J. Greenhalgh

Students will be encouraged to develop and improve conflict management skills and how to utilize those skills in managing conflicts that arise in personal and professional situations. Students will have an opportunity to explore alternative models and methods of resolving disputes.


Sociology

Introduction to Sociology

SOC1010 W 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 34315

J. Nowicki

Introduces the basic concepts in the field of sociology with emphasis upon the application of these concepts to the understanding of the American institutions of politics, economics, religion, education, marriage and family.


The Final Chapter: A Study in Death and Dying

SOC1090 M 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33279

J. Nowicki

Students will develop an understanding of the death and dying process while exploring their own attitudes, feelings and beliefs. Topics covered include what is dying, the grieving process, children and death, suicide, violent deaths, cultural attitudes and euthanasia. Community resources will also be explored.


Crime and Deviance

SOC2010 R 0630p-0930p    Section: 1
CRN: 33272

T. O'Connor

Examines and debates definitions of crime and deviance, studying: street, corporate, organized and political crime; drug use; mental illness; crimes by and against women; and other forms of crime and deviance. Also explored are the social, political and economic conditions that lead to crime and deviance and the social response to them.